Copenhagen Marathon

It was hot on Sunday. There were cobbles. There were bridges. Bridges = ramps = elevation (400ft to be precise). But all of these things are excuses really… Although the build up had been pretty good, I’ll be completely honest, I wasn’t entirely prepared mentally for Copenhagen Marathon. This reinforced to me how important it is to prepare psychologically to run 26.2 miles. This is where I maybe came unstuck…

The goal was to run 2:50. There were signs in training that this was a possibility… New personal bests over Half Marathon,10k, 5k and Mile distances showed that it was theoretically possible to drop 7 minutes from the time I ran in Berlin (2:57). But then, I had skipped a few long runs over the course of the 16 week programme and hadn’t trained that much at the required minute mile pace on as many runs as I should have. This probably also counted on the day, I could feel it noticeably in the legs when the mileage went over 2 hours. But what actually happened?

Well, I ran 1:25 through halfway which was bang on target. Then I probably got dehydrated. Actually scrap that, I definitely got dehydrated. It was 20C+ in the sun. I hadn’t slept enough or hydrated enough in the few days prior either. So whilst running 13 miles at goal pace was possible, I faded in the latter half of the race when loss of electrolytes lead to cramping. As evidenced by the splits below… ouch!

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There was one point in the race that stands out. Around mile 17 there was a ramp over a motorway and I caught myself thinking, maybe I should just walk up this? I didn’t, but I remember my heart rate soaring afterward. Then after a false flat not far around the corner I came to a water station and did end up walking. Probably for a good 30 seconds. This in turn gave my brain opportunity to listen to my body and it probably worked out that something was up and it wasn’t enjoying itself! I started getting cramps in my calves after that. To the point where they were just knotting up entirely and I was having to stop. This happened several times. Although I could still muster a 7:30ish pace through the last 4/5 miles I was struggling and I knew it. And soon 2:50 turned into 2:52, into 2:54, into 2:58, into get under 3:00! Mentally, I think I probably could have gritted it out a bit harder. I definitely gave into that feeling of ‘I’m starting to wish this was over’ rather than ‘I can boss this out for another 30 minutes’… And this is what I mean by needing that mental rigour to say, ‘You know what, just dig deep. There’s not long left. Give it everything.’

The notorious NBRO cheer station was much needed relief from running long stretches with very few people in front of me to run at / after. These guys were amazing and it gave me added incentive to dig deep between miles 22 and 25, to make sure that I got to that finish line and crossed it in a way that would make them proud, as if they were waiting for me at the end as well as mile 21.

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Speaking of support – quick mention to the Copenhagen crowd and particularly a lovely lovely lady waiting with a pushchair who having spotted me cramping, beckoned me over and fished me a gel out of her handbag! This was a lifesaver as I’d ended up using all of mine sooner than I thought I’d need them. I only hope this hadn’t been for her husband who’d ended up without! At the end of the race I did the typical fall to the knees, potential medical attention required, jump up and go ‘no no I’m ok’, think about crying etc. Then I saw my buddy Hugo who’d completed his first marathon in 3:02! Yes Hugo!

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Then my other friends started coming through one by one. And in the end I realised that we’d all had to tough it out that day and actually some of the performances were amazing given they were first marathons / conditions were hard / we’d all dug in.

Warwick, Danny, Steve, Wyatt, Rich, Jason, Andrew, Dougie, Manni, Alex, Liz, Charlotte, Melany, Cynthia, Jess, David, Will, Alex, Clare… EVERYBODY (sorry if I’ve missed anybody out)! Massive congratulations, I am super proud of you all, hence the smiles after what was a pretty hard day at the races for me. This is what running with my crew, with NBRO, with Bridge The Gap is all about. Looking out for each other, supporting one another and celebrating together. And that’s what transformed the Copenhagen Marathon from the toughest race ever into one of the most rewarding. Bring on the next!

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